Welcome to Correspondence Sign in | Join | Help

Meta-analysis of topical corticosteroids application to tracheal tubes

Last post 21 Nov 2018, 1:30 PM by Akira Kuriyama. 1 replies.
To submit a new response, please Register or Sign in.
Sort Letters: Previous Next
  •  18 Nov 2018, 4:18 AM 2691

    Meta-analysis of topical corticosteroids application to tracheal tubes

    Kuriyama et al. included 20 trials for their meta-analysis of topical corticosteroid application to tracheal tubes for preventing post-operative sore throat [1], but appear to have missed 2 trials [2, 3] that met their inclusion criteria (ie steroid applied to tracheal tube cuff directly, by spray or by soaking the tube with steroid solution). We were unable to access their reference 53 [4] in PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Wan fang Database and the China Academic Journal Network Publishing Database.

    Furthermore, we think that the authors may have erroneously reported some of the data presented. In Sarki et al.'s study (their ref. 47 [5]), 6 (not 3) patients developed postoperative sore throat at 24 hours in corticosteroid group. In Selvaraj et al.'s study (their ref. 48 [6]), 75 patients were randomised into three groups involving application of steroid gel, lignocaine jelly or nothing applied to endotracheal tube, whereas Kuriyama et al.'s forest plot shows 30 patients in each group.

    Do the authors think that these omissions and errors would have affected their results and conclusions? 

    N. P. Singh

    University of Manitoba,

    Winnipeg, Canada. 

    J. K. Makkar

    Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research,

    Chandigarh, India.

    P. M. Singh

    Washington University,

    St Louis, MO, USA.

    Email: nscjk200@gmail.com

     

    No external funding or conflict of interest declared.

     

    References 

    1. Kuriyama A, Maeda H, Sun R, Aga M. Topical application of corticosteroids to tracheal tubes to prevent postoperative sore throat in adults undergoing tracheal intubation: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Anaesthesia 2018; 73: 1546-56
    2. Rafiei MR, Arianpour N, Rezvani M, Ebrahimi A. Effects of intracuff dexamethasone on post-extubation reactions. Journal of Research in Medical Sciences 2012; 17: 338-43.
    3. Mafiana R, Maas EM, Theodorus et al. Comparison of the efficacy between triamcinolone gel 0, 1% and lidocaine gel 2% applied over tracheal tube to reduce postoperative sore throat, cough, and hoarseness after general anesthesia. International Journal of Health Sciences Research 2017; 7: 6-15.
    4.  Ren D. Zhang C [The clinical research of tetracycline cortisone eye ointment applied over tracheal tube to prevent postoperative airway complications]. Modern Journal of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine 2013; 22: 3505-7.
    5. Sarki AM, Mohammed AD. A comparison of betamethasone gel and lidocaine jelly as prophylaxis against intubation-associated throat complications. Nigerian Journal of Basic and Clinical Sciences 2015; 12: 105.
    6. Selvaraj T, Dhanpal R. Evaluation of the application of topical steroids on the tracheal tube in decreasing postoperative sore throat. Journal of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology 2002; 18: 167-70.

     

     

     

     

     

  •  21 Nov 2018, 1:30 PM 2693 in reply to 2691

    Reaffirming topical corticosteroid application to tracheal tubes

    Reaffirming topical corticosteroid application to tracheal tubes


    Singh et al. are concerned that our systematic review on the efficacy of topical corticosteroid application to tracheal tubes to prevent postoperative sore throat [1] has some errors. However, I would like to refute their comprehension by hereby listing my answers.

    First, our review focused on topical corticosteroids that were applied to tracheal tubes. We did not focus on "intracuff" corticosteroids, which Rafiei et al. intended to examine [2] as already stated in our inclusion criteria.

    Second, the our search was updated on December 7, 2017. The study by Mafiana et al. [3] was published later that month. Further, we may have an access to this study only through Google Scholar and this study was listed in Google Scholar in 2018.

    Third, Singh et al. insist that they could not find the study by Ren et al.[4] The search capability of Singh et al. is completely beyond the scope of our systematic review.

    Fourth, Singh et al. are concerned that our data from the study by Sarki et al.[5] are incorrect. We extracted the data exactly at 24 hours after extubation/surgery from the Table 2 in their article. Please read the article carefully.

    Fifth, Singh et al. concerned that the number of participants in the study by Selvarj et al.[6] is 75. I disagree. The number of study participants in this study was consistently shown as 90 throughout text and tables, while that in the abstract was 75. Please read the article carefully.

    We therefore reaffirm the the efficacy of topical corticosteroid application to tracheal tubes.


    A. Kuriyama

    Kurashiki Central Hospital

    Okayama, Japan

    Email: akira.kuriyama.jpn@gmail.com


    1. Kuriyama A, Maeda H, Sun R, Aga M. Topical application of corticosteroids to tracheal tubes to prevent postoperative sore throat in adults undergoing tracheal intubation: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Anaesthesia 2018; 73: 1546-562.

    2. Rafiei MR, Arianpour N, Rezvani M, Ebrahimi A. Effects of intracuff dexamethasone on post-extubation reactions. Journal of Research in Medical Sciences 2012; 17: 338-43.3.

    3. Mafiana R, Maas EM, Theodorus et al. Comparison of the efficacy between triamcinolone gel 0, 1% and lidocaine gel 2% applied over tracheal tube to reduce postoperative sore throat, cough, and hoarseness after general anesthesia. International Journal of Health Sciences Research 2017; 7: 6-15.4.

    4. Ren D. Zhang C [The clinical research of tetracycline cortisone eye ointment applied over tracheal tube to prevent postoperative airway complications]. Modern Journal of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine 2013; 22: 3505-7. 

    5. Sarki AM, Mohammed AD. A comparison of betamethasone gel and lidocaine jelly as prophylaxis against intubation-associated throat complications. Nigerian Journal of Basic and Clinical Sciences 2015; 12: 105.

    6. Selvaraj T, Dhanpal R. Evaluation of the application of topical steroids on the tracheal tube in decreasing postoperative sore throat. Journal of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology 2002; 18: 167-70.

View as RSS news feed in XML

Our site uses cookies to improve your experience.You can find out more about our use of cookies in our standard cookie policy, including instructions on how to reject and delete cookies if you wish to do so.

By continuing to browse this site you agree to us using cookies as described in our standard cookie policy .

CLOSE